Spectra Pulse

April 26, 2008

There is an article in this new magazine by Jeff Vandermeer about the Unsung Heroes of Science Fiction and Fantasy. In it he mentions my book Dr. Black and the Guerrillia, which is nice.  (I snagged the photo below from his blog.)

 

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Maiko Haaaan!!!

April 25, 2008

This is a strange film starring Sadao Abe as a man working for a noodle factory (yes another noodle themed film) who is obsessed with apprentice geishas.

 Complete with a musical number, ludicrous humour and, yes, many many geishas, this film might not be for everyone, but it is surely worth a look for those interested in . . . this sort of thing.

The first half of the film is a bit more lively than the second, as it is more packed with special effects, while the second half sort of falls into a traditional story-line (boy gets girl).

Maiko Haaaan!!!.jpg


Films Recently Seen

April 22, 2008

Shadows in the Palace: A slow moving Korean historical “mystery” that doesn’t seem to quite know what to do with itself.

Shaolin Abbot: A rather dull Shaw Brothers film.

Shubun: A decent Kurosawa flick. Certainly not as good as most of his films, but worth a look, as it features his standard players and some entertaining scenes.

Mafioso: An Alberto Sordi film made available by Criterion. Not one of Sordi’s best, but if you don’t speak Italian one of the few out there for you to see.

Walk Hard: Funny.

Resurrecting the Champ: Bloody Awful. Don’t see it.


Obama’s Friday Night PA Speech

April 19, 2008

Kaleidotrope 4

April 17, 2008

Just received issue 4 of Kaleidotrope, which has my story Rome (a Metrophilia) in it. It is a zine a bit (in my opinion) similar to Electric Velocipede.

The complete TOC is as follows:

Fiction
“Molting” by Andrew Howard
“Word Count: Negative 1” by Ashley Arnold
“The Three Wishes of Miles Vander” by Bill Ward
“Premature” by Mark Rich
“Paradise” by Adam Lowe
“White Sheets” by Mike Driver
“Rome (a Metrophilia)” by Brendan Connell
“Half-Sneeze Johnny” by Kurt Kirchmeier
“My Cthulhu Story” (a comic) by G.W. Thomas
“Furrier” by Flavian Mark Lupinetti
“She’s a Hearth” by Paul Abbamondi
“The Life and Times of a Hungry World, Told Briefly” by Alex Dally MacFarlane
“The Transparency” by Michael Obilade

Poetry
“Househunting on Mars” by Bonita Kale
“Praise for What I Don’t Know” by Thomas Zimmerman
“Cracked Shells” by Beth Langford
“Spring in the Lab” by Alyce Wilson
“Farm School” by Marcie Lynn Tentchoff
“A Manual For Good Housekeeping in the Age of Global Warming” by Miranda Gaw
“Ivanikha” by Dana Koster
Two Poems by Franz K. Baskett
“Worldviews on a Desert Trail” by Jason Huskey
“Towards the Afterlife” by Aurelio Rico Lopez III

Nonfiction
“Who Goes There,” Betty Ragan’s interview with Marc Schuster and Tom Powers
“The Rise of the Fembots: A Brief Introduction to Female Android Sexuality in Film” by Eric Borer

 


More Crazy Chinese Govt. Claims

April 10, 2008

As reported in this article, China is now claiming that “separatists” have been plotting to kidnap Olympic athletes at the Beijing games. 

Of course they supply no proof whatsoever.

The unfortunate thing is that many will undoubtedly believe this clumsy piece of propaganda. And now of course China can claim that the Tibetans are “terrorists”.


Older Brother, Younger Sister

April 9, 2008

Original Title: Ani imôto

Year: 1953

Director: Mikio Naruse

This little known Japanese film is really special. At just under 90 minutes, it starts after the story has already started and ends without any real resolution, firmly setting it apart from the vast majority of celluloid out there.

The story is about a family who were once been wealthy but, due to industrialisation, have become poor, deriving their income from a small store which sells ices, popsicles, lemonade etc., as well as the wages their son earns engraving tomb-stones.

The older daughter (played by Machiko Kyo) is pregnant by a man who has disappeared. The younger daughter is in love with the adopted son of a noodle manufacturer.

That is the story. Great acting, superb cinematography, a tight script and a truly wonderful score by Ichirô Saitô make it work. In a big way.

兄妹/Ani imoto(1953) 电影图片 DVD封套 #01 大图 398X500